an encouraging lesson from the American Revolution

Museums used to be boring, now they captivate me. I am not sure who has done the most changing: me or the museums. This apparent good news does come at a cost: I’ve become the perpetual caboose. I wander behind the rest of the family at half-speed, my little black notebook in hand: reading, studying, learning.

When we arrived at the American Revolution Museum at Yorktown, I was a little nervous for my family. How long would they have to wait for me this time? In the end, the wait was worth it. I walked away with more than just a history lesson. Continue reading “an encouraging lesson from the American Revolution”

Yorktown’s life lesson: the gabion basket

As I enter the Yorktown National Historical Battlefield, I carry with me the knowledge that I’ve ascertained primarily through osmosis while staying in this historic triangleI am standing at the site of the last major battle in the Revolutionary War.

I did not know this one week ago.

I knew about the Revolutionary War mind you–I’m not completely incompetent. But when I hear the word “York,” I think of peppermint patties and cute little terrier dogs–not a battle sight.

Continue reading “Yorktown’s life lesson: the gabion basket”

Jamestown National Park: a refreshing history lesson

We step out the door lunch in hand. School for today involves a close encounter at Jamestown National Park. The kids abandon their game of stick-war and climb into the car. Trent pulls up the directions on our GPS. Siri informs us that we are 27 minutes away by car, 1 hour 33 minutes by bike or 5 hours by foot. The irony of our options, of our directional exactness to the Jamestown Settlement, does not escape me. If only the English settlers of the past could see what was in store for future voyagers!

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making room for margin

“You must create more margin so you have room for what’s important, not merely urgent.” -Michael Hayatt

Its 4:33PM and we are driving home from the Lost Colony National Park. I’m slowly digesting the reality that once again my high school history education was grossly lacking. The US had English settlers before Jamestown? And they disappeared? Mind. Blown.

Rerouting plans

We’ve been gone for several hours and are just minutes away from our RV home. Trent looks to his left and spots a crowd of people gathered on top of a sand dune. Absentmindedly he says, “Look at all the people, I wonder what is going on over there?”

“Let’s go see,” I reply, testing his both his curiosity and the boundaries of our spontaneity. He raises his eyebrows and responds by tapping the blinker. Within moments our van is pointed in a new direction.

Continue reading “making room for margin”